Ora Norcutt Wentworth and Arthur Wentworth

Arthur Elbridge Wentworth Biography

Arthur Elbridge Wentworth, my paternal grandfather, was born on September 25, 1888 in Jackson, Carroll County, New Hampshire. His parents were Daniel Wentworth and Nancy Emery. He was the second of ten children: Alice (1886-1934), Arthur ((1888-1976), Eugene (1891-1905), Shirley Aldo (male)(1892-1965), Mary (1893-1975), Lillian (1895-1937), Hollis (1897-1897), Rosie (1899-1899), Ellen (1900-1904), and William (1901-1958).

Grandpa was a farmer as were his father, Daniel, and his grandfather, Levi.  The Bartlett/Jackson area is in the White Mountains. Many family dairy farms and small towns were in the lush valleys. Family members lived close by and most of Arthur's immediate family members  never left the general area. He was the exception to the normal path chosen.

He left New Hampshire when he was a young adult because work opportunities were limited. He and a friend rode the trains (hobo style) to Montana. See my post 'Homesteading in Montana' for more about that adventure. In the 1910 census, he was farming in Stanford, Fergus County, Montana.

He married my grandmother, Ora Norcutt, on November 8, 1916 in Lewistown, Fergus, Montana. Three of their children were born in Montana: Melvin Arthur (1917-1985), Glennis Addie (1919-2002), and Deloris Eleanor (1921-2016). My father, Ronald, was born on the way from Montana to the West Coast in Princeton, Idaho (1923-2007). Thelma Lavell (1924-1977) and Velma Loretta (1926) were born in Elma, Grays Harbor County, Washington.

Upon arriving in Grays Harbor County, the family farmed on rented property on Russell Rd in the Chehalis River valley. They moved to a nearby farm on South Bank Road which per the U.S. Census; they rented in 1930 and had purchased by 1940. The dairy farm would remain in the family until the early 1970's. Their children attended grade school at the Fords Prairie school which was about a mile from the farm. The younger children rode on a horse, usually slightly lame, and the older children walked alongside. They all attended high school in Oakville, Washington.

My father, Ronald, returned to the farm after serving four years in the Army and driving a passenger bus for a while. Dad and Grandpa farmed together until 1972.  Grandpa especially loved taking care of the calves and being on a tractor, working the soil, and harvesting the grass crops. When I was quite young, probably in the mid-1960's, he had a massive heart attack. He was told to go home, take it easy, and absolutely no more farming. Grandpa rejected the doctor's advice and he was back feeding calves, driving his tractor, and farming in no time. He retired from dairy farming in 1972.

My family lived on a farm one-half mile from the dairy farm. When my grandparents' farm was sold, a house was built for them on a parcel of land across the road from our farm. They would live in the "little house" for the rest of their lives. After retirement, they remained active members in the Sharon and Pomona Granges, grew a large vegetable garden, and raised chickens.

One of my fondest memories is Grandpa sitting in the kitchen of the old farmhouse as close to the wood stove as possible without his chair . It would be so hot on that side of the large country-style kitchen that I could barely breathe. Grandma would be across the room with the window open year round. During the colder months, it was freezing cold on her half of the room. They were happy as can be. Usually Grandma was cooking or baking and the kitchen smelled good.  I always felt happy and safe in their kitchen.

Another memory is being in the backseat of their 1958 brown and cream Chevrolet sedan with my brother, Art. Grandpa would drive part of the way between the two farms with his hands in the air.  We were amazed that he could drive the car with no hands on the steering wheel. We begged him to drive with no hands all the time. He delighted in accommodating our back seat pleas! Grandpa got into big trouble with Grandma when she found out what was going on. To our great disappointment, Grandpa drove the car like everyone else, both hands on the wheel, from then on. I believe he was as disappointed as we were.

On May 30, 1976, he had a fatal heart attack. Just a couple days prior, most of the family had seen him at my wedding. It was a blessing that so many were able to be with him that day. He worked hard all of his life, took care of his family, and was vibrant and healthy to the end of his life.

The farm on South Bank Rd, Oakville, Grays Harbor County, Washington

Arthur E. Wentworth, kitchen in old farm house

Arthur Wentworth and farm truck, So. Bank Rd. farm